Research

Peer-Reviewed Articles

Wayne, M. (Forthcoming). Netflix, Amazon, and Branded Television Content in Subscription Video On-Demand Portals. Media, Culture & Society. [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2017). Depicting the Racist Past in a “Post-Racial” Age: The White, Male Protagonist in Hell on Wheels and The KnickAlphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media, 13: 105-116. [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2016). Critically Acclaimed and Cancelled: FX’s The Bridge, Cable Channel as Brand, and the Adaptation of Scripted TV Formats. VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, 5(9): 116-125. [link] [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2016). Cultural Class Analysis and Audience Reception in American Television’s “Third Golden Age.” Interactions: Studies in Communication & Culture, 7(1), 41-57. [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2016). Middle-Class Viewers and Breaking Bad: Audience and Social Status in the Post-Network Era. The Projector: A Journal on Film, Media, and Culture, 16(1), 23-38. [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2016). Post-Network Audiences and Cable Crime Drama. Northern Lights: Film & Media Studies Yearbook, 14(1), 141-157. [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2015). Guilty Pleasures and Cultural Legitimation: Exploring High-Status Reality TV in the Post-Network Era. Journal of Popular Culture, 48(5), 990-1009. [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2015). Scholars as Audiences, Symbolic Boundaries, and Culturally Legitimated Prime-Time Cable Drama. Global Media Journal: German Edition, 5(1), 1-16. [link] [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2014). Ambivalent Anti-Heroes and Racist Rednecks on Basic Cable: Post-Race Ideology and White Masculinities on FX. Journal of Popular Television, 2(2), 205-225. [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2014). Mitigating Colorblind Racism in the Post-Network Era: Class-Inflected Masculinities in The Shield, Sons of Anarchy, and JustifiedThe Communication Review, 17(3), 183-201. [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2013). Moral Ambiguity, Colorblind Ideology, and the Racist Other in Prime-Time Cable Drama. Cinephile, 9(1), 15-19. [PDF]

Chapters in Edited Collections

Wayne, M. (2015). Post-Network Era Television, Cultural Hierarchies, and the Sociological Uses of The Wire beyond Urban Inequality. The Wire in the College Classroom: Pedagogical Approaches to the Humanities, K. Dillon and N. Crummey (eds.), McFarland Publishing, 47-60. [PDF]

Wayne, M. (2014). Appreciating Nietzsche in Episodic Drama: The Highbrow Intertextuality and Middlebrow Reception of Criminal Minds. Critical Reflections on Audience and Narrativity: New Connections, New Perspectives, V. Marinescu, S. Branea, and B. Mitu (eds.), Ibidem-Verlag, 49-62. [PDF]

Other Publications

Wayne, M. (2017). Netflix in Israel. Global Internet TV Consortium. [link] [PDF]

Wayne, M. and Press, A. (2017). Television. The American Middle Class: An Economic Encyclopedia of Progress and Poverty, Rycroft, R. (ed.), Greenwood: 989-992. [PDF]

Press, A., Mai, F., Tripodi, F. and Wayne, M. (2015). Audiences, Media. International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Science, 2nd Edition, Wright, J. (ed.), Elsevier: 216-222. [PDF]

 

Advertisements